CoMM B and C: The Terminology of Turning and Balancing

For old times' sake, some educational info for everyone who needs more control over his/her bike.

CoMM B and C: The Terminology of Turning and Balancing

Postby David W » 07 Apr 2018, 01:25

The A-B-Cs of bike control include the topics B and C, which are short for Balancing and Cornering. The proposed purpose of this thread is to provide terminology for those readers who wish to post in upcoming, CoMM threads about Balancing and Cornering. (There is no plan to address the A topic, Accelerating, in the near term.)

For starters, we should avoid technical terms and jargon;
Any terms we propose should be put into bold italics like this;
And we can start with Balancing.

The Basics of Balancing:

- Talking Sides:

The bare term side can refer to either of a bike’s two sides. (One way to refer to those sides is: the bike’s left side, and its right side.)

The top side can be referred to as the bike’s shiny side; the bottom side, as its rubber side.

Example: A bike is either straight up, or else it is leaning toward one of its two sides.

- Getting Directions:

The bare term moving bike can refer to one that is rolling forward on its wheels.

The two lateral directions that any bike has can be called: from the left side toward the right side; and from right to left.

Readers, the rest of this post has been revised; so you might want to check out the newer version in my post below dated 08 Apr 2018, 18:23.

- No visible means of Support?

A stationary bike is supported if it is parked on one of its stands. A bike is also supported if one or both of its rider’s feet is touching, or dabbing the road. A bike that is supported by neither a stand nor by its rider can be called unsupported.

Beginning with Balancing:

The shiny side of an unsupported bike is generally free to move laterally, relative to that bike’s rubber side.

An unsupported bike is balanced if its shiny side is not moving laterally, relative to its rubber side.

Edit: Below, we change the wording from balanced to in balance.

------------------------------------------------------Red Line-------------------------------------------------------

- Two questions we can answer later:

- Is there an alternate way to describe when an unsupported bike is balanced?
- And how will we describe an unsupported bike that is not balanced?

- But before any of that, we should first look for plain, English terms related to Turning and Cornering.
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Re: CoMM B and C: The Terminology of Turning and Balancing

Postby alans1100 » 07 Apr 2018, 09:39

David W wrote:
- No visible means of Support?

A bike that is supported by neither a stand nor by its rider can be called unsupported.
In this case the bike after laying on either side can said to be supported by the ground. Not a favourable position for any bike to be in.

The rest I will have to think about though a bike essentially needs to be moving before it will balance.
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Re: CoMM B and C: The Terminology of Turning and Balancing

Postby mbrST1100 » 07 Apr 2018, 10:58

David W wrote:A bike that is supported by neither a stand nor by its rider can be called unsupported.

Rather dropped or tipped over...
Newton took care of it and that...

Stability in motion is due the gyroscopic effects... also explains design and function of steering.

... transmitted from a CAT S60 thing ...
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Re: CoMM B and C: The Terminology of Turning and Balancing

Postby David W » 07 Apr 2018, 21:33

alans1100 wrote:
David W wrote:... A bike that is supported by neither a stand nor by its rider can be called unsupported.
In this case the bike after laying on either side can said to be supported by the ground. Not a favourable position for any bike to be in. ...
So I am adding two phrases that are coloured red:
David W wrote:...
.. A stationary bike is supported if it is parked on one of its stands, or if it has tipped and is held up only by one of its engine guards. A bike is also supported if one or both of its rider’s feet is touching, or dabbing the road. A bike that is supported by neither a stand nor by an engine guard nor by its rider can be called unsupported.

The shiny side of an unsupported, moving bike is generally free to move laterally, relative to that bike’s rubber side. ...
That third and final word which is coloured red,, the word moving, has been deleted from the original because it is not necessary. (Yes, in order to balance a bike by using its steering, the bike must be moving; in fact, it must be moving at a pretty decent speed for that steering method to be effective. But I can hold my stationary bike straight up to balance it, then release it for a moment, and it will be balanced at the moment I release it and it becomes unsupported. Thus , a bike need not always be moving forward to be balanced.)
alans1100 wrote: ... a bike essentially needs to be moving before it will balance.
Again, a bike needs to be moving forward if one wants to use its steering to periodically make it balanced.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
mbrST1100 wrote:
David W wrote:A bike that is supported by neither a stand nor by its rider can be called unsupported.

Rather dropped or tipped over...
Newton took care of it and that... ...
I changed that quoted sentence to: A bike that is supported by neither a stand nor by an engine guard nor by its rider can be called unsupported.
So an unsupported bike is not one that has tipped over and is at rest. Nor is it one that has fallen and is sliding down the road on one of its engine guards.

What we can say is that an unsupported bike is always either balanced, or else its shiny side is moving laterally, relative to it rubber side.
And again, an unsupported bike need not be moving forward, but mbrST1100 is correct that if it is not moving forward, gravity will soon start its shiny side to move laterally.
We are not yet describing our bike control technique; here, we are merely coming up with consistent terminology that we can use to later describe our technique. (Again, we also need some terminology for steering/turning/cornering, no?)
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Re: CoMM B and C: The Terminology of Turning and Balancing

Postby mbrST1100 » 08 Apr 2018, 08:42

David W wrote:So an unsupported bike is not one that has tipped over and is at rest.

errr... its then either balanced/held by a person, or leaning against an obstacle... hence it is supported... Q.E.D. ;)

A rare, but technically possible exception/explanation:
so called straight drivers who manage to flat-wear their rear tire so far, that the bike will actually remain upright on it... :lol:

And then there is this thing... 8-)

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Re: CoMM B and C: The Terminology of Turning and Balancing

Postby alans1100 » 08 Apr 2018, 13:11

mbrST1100 wrote:
phpBB [video]


All I had was a black rectangle. So I posted the link for anyone else that might have a problem.

https://youtu.be/mWsBRgq7pk8
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Re: CoMM B and C: The Terminology of Turning and Balancing

Postby David W » 09 Apr 2018, 01:23

I will now have a another go at it, picking up towards the end of my initial attempt, where some questions arose:
David W wrote:... - No visible means of Support?

We can say a bike is supported, or constrained laterally if its shiny side is not entirely free to move in either lateral direction, relative to its rubber side. A stationary bike is supported, or constrained laterally when it is parked securely on one of its stands, or if it has tipped over and is at rest on one of its engine guards. A bike is also supported or constrained laterally if one or both of its rider’s feet is touching, or dabbing the road.

A bike that is not supported or constrained laterally in any way can be called an unsupported, or laterally free bike.

Example: During the vast majority of any rider's long ride, the bike is unsupported and laterally free. (The only real exception is if the rider is doing a bit too much foot dabbing, such as can happen in stop-and-go traffic.)

Beginning with Balanced:

The shiny side of an unsupported or laterally free bike is generally free to move laterally, relative to that bike’s rubber side.

A bike is in balance if its shiny side is not moving laterally, relative to its rubber side even though the bike is unsupported and laterally free.
(This defines the term in balance as a a descriptor of the bike, as what can be called an adjective.)

To balance ones bike is to bring it into balance, or to cause it to become in balance.
(This defines the term balance as what is called a verb.)

------------------------------------------------------Red Line-------------------------------------------------------
- Two questions we can answer later:

- Is there an alternate way to describe when an unsupported or laterally free bike is in balance?
- And how will we describe an unsupported, laterally free bike that is not in balance?
(An example would be a bike that is moving at highway speed and is the process of being leaned over for an approaching bend in the road.) ...

In my original post (the first one in this thread), I used the term balanced instead of the newer term in balance which I just used. The newer term in balance can only describe the bike. The older term balanced
can describe the bike (which is how I meant to use it originally), or it can be used to describe a rider's action, as in the sentence "The rider balanced the bike." (I am abandoning the term balanced because it has two meanings.)

And I am adding the new terms balance and to balance which I think can only refer to a rider's actions. (Example: How does the rider use the steering to balance a moving bike?)
alans1100 wrote:... a bike essentially needs to be moving before it will balance.
I would reword that now as ... a bike essentially needs to be moving before its rider can balance it.
mbrST1100 wrote:
David W wrote:So an unsupported bike is not one that has tipped over and is at rest.
errr... its then either balanced/held by a person, or leaning against an obstacle... hence it is supported... Q.E.D. ;) ...
A bike that has tipped over and is at rest ... I would say that bike is supported by one of its engine guards, which laterally restrains its shiny side from moving any further downward. Such a bike is no longer unsupported or laterally free. What you seem to be pointing out is that any unsupported bike at rest will soon ... get some kind of support, possibly by one of its engine guards.
And finally, here is a typical example that I think is (more) worthy of discussion: You are riding down a straight highway. You keep your bike (more or less) straight up and in balance there. You approach a long, sweeping bend in the road. As you lean your bike into that curve, it is unbalanced, but once you are "in" the curve and rounding it, you have your bike more or less in balance all the way around that bend. As you exit that curve for another straight stretch, and you are straightening up your bike, it is again unbalanced, for that short period of time. (And at no point was your bike supported or laterally constrained.)
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Re: CoMM B and C: The Terminology of Turning and Balancing

Postby David W » 12 Apr 2018, 16:15

David W wrote:...
- Two questions we can answer ...

- Is there an alternate way to describe when an unsupported [and laterally free] bike is balanced [in the sense that it is in balance]?

- And how will we describe an unsupported [laterally free] bike that is not balanced? ...

One alternate way to talk about balancing a bike is to use the term lean angle (where the word angle is from geometry).

If a bike is straight up, then we can say its lean angle is zero. If a bike is leaning, then its lean angle describes how much it is leaning.
(In either case, the lean angle of the bike describes whether the bike is leaning and if so, how much.)

Using that term, a bike is in balance if its lean angle is not changing (despite the fact that the bike is unsupported, which means its shiny side is free to move laterally).

And a bike is unbalanced if its lean angle is changing.

Simplified Summary: If a bike is moving fast enough so that its rider is not foot dabbing, then that bike is in balance if its lean angle is not changing (which means that its shiny side is not moving laterally, relative to its rubber side.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

What are some words to describe an unbalanced bike that is leaning, and whose lean angle is increasing?

Here are eight ways:

0. That bike is leaning more and more towards one of its sides.

1. The shiny side of that bike is moving laterally and is getting closer and closer to the road.

2. That bike is being leaned over by its rider.

3. That bike is tipping some (without implying that it will tip over).

4. That bike has leaning motion.

5. That bike is rocking down some.

6. That bike is being rocked down (some) by its rider.

7. That bike is unbalanced toward the side ... toward which it is leaning.

Example: I will use number 4 in the following sentence.

Numbers 2 and 6 imply that all of the bike's ... leaning motion ... is intentional. The other six do not.

When the time comes, use whichever words you like. Or say the same thing yet another way (but preferably in English).
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Adding now one more suggested, balancing related term, before we go to steering and cornering terms:

The posture of a bike consists of answers to all of the following:

Is the bike straight up or leaning?

If it is leaning, towards which side, and how much? (The bike's lean angle is one way to indicate how much.)

Two sample usages:

1. A bike is in balance if its posture is stable and unchanging.

2. In order to change the bike's path of travel, such as when riding in a straight path and then causing the bike to veer off to one side, one must first change the bike's posture. (Merely steering it in the desired direction does not work.)
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Re: CoMM B and C: Turning now to the Terminology of Turning

Postby David W » 21 May 2018, 00:07

For conversations concerning cornering, we might need some additional terms. So we now turn to the terminology of turning.

The steering portion of a bike is its handlebar, its front wheel and tyre, and all of the mechanical bits that connect that bar to that wheel.

The bare term to steer can (tentatively) mean to manipulate the handlebar in order to point the front wheel in a desired direction. Thus, the bare term to steer does not indicate the purpose for manipulating the steering portion of the bike.

The purpose of steering a bike can be indicated by adding an additional word to the bare term to steer:

To steer for direction, or to steer directionally is to steer for the purpose of causing the bike's front wheel to roll in a desired direction so that the rest of the bike also follows in that direction.

To steer an unbalanced bike for balance is to steer it so as to bring it into balance.

And one more, that is tentative at this point: To counter steer a bike that is in balance is ... to steer that bike an extra amount towards one side in order to unbalance that bike towards its counter, or other side.

In summary, the bare term to steer a vehicle (such as a car) commonly has the implication of steering for direction, but we are tentatively overriding that implication because a rider might manipulate the steering portion of a bike for reasons other than for direction.

Example: When traveling down a straight portion of road and approaching a bend, a rider might well start by (counter) steering the bike toward the outside of that bend, which is clearly not the direction the rider wants the bike to eventually travel in.

A bike is either steered straight ahead, or else it is steered towards one of its two sides.

A simple curve is one that has both a definite "inside" and an "outside". For example, a C shaped curve is a simple curve, as is a U shaped curve, or a J shaped curve. But an S curve is not a simple curve.

A circular curve is one that is a portion of, or is all of, a fixed circle. For example, if one is riding in a roundabout, then ones bike is probably traveling in a curve that is approximately circular.
Any circular curve is a simple curve.

The inside of a simple curve can alternately be called its lower side. And its outside can alternately be called its counter side.

To counter steer a balanced bike is to steer it an extra amount toward one of its sides in order to unbalance it toward its other side, or toward its counter side. (That is a tentative definition. And we have yet to discuss counter steering an unbalanced bike.)

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Red Line----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
To square up the front end of a bike that is steered to one side is to steer it so that it becomes steered straight ahead. Thus, we avoid adding the term: "to straighten up the steering" of a bike ... because that wording sounds too much like our existing term: to straighten up a bike (which means to cause a leaning bike to no longer be leaning).
'Tis not its looks, but how it cooks.
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