DVLA Confused Over Bike Tax Changes

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Re: DVLA Confused Over Bike Tax Changes

Postby alans1100 » 22 Jan 2014, 15:49

Keith Legge wrote:Vehicle registration and road tax are two separate items.

The reg (number plate)stays with the vehicle throughout its life, road tax must be paid on all vehicles every 12 months by the owner when the vehicle is sold the road tax stays with the vehicle its included in your sale price. The road tax disc must be displayed on the vehicle.



We just have the vehicle registration which is about $AUD37 a year for my 1100 or $10 for 3 months and now they've started a monthly direct debit method if you wish to do so. On top of the registration fee is the compulsory Insurance, admin fee and emergency services fee (police, ambo and fire) which adds another $97 (3 months) and $356 for the year

Over here when a vehicle is transferred to a new owner (they pay) there is a transfer fee based on the value of the vehicle or sale price (which ever is higher)
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Re: DVLA Confused Over Bike Tax Changes

Postby Forest 1100 » 22 Jan 2014, 21:27

Seems to me the Brit government could take some lessons from the KISS manual (Keeping It Simple Stupid). Ours is sort of like the Aussies - those criminals of long ago must have taken the brains of the country when they were shipped out ;).

When we buy a new, or used vehicle, the Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) registers the vehicle to the new owner's name and you pay for a licence plate and insurance coverage before you get on the road. You also pay a one time tax, based on the sale price of the vehicle. Each year, you pay to renew your insurance and licence plate registration, but you keep the same plate for as long as you own the car.

With each yearly renewal, you get a small sticker with the current year's date, which is affixed to a space provided on the rear licence plate. They are very delicate and will not survive intact, should someone decide to try to steal yours and put it on their plate.

When you sell the vehicle, the new owner must go to the DMV, with the transfer documents, pay tax on the sale price and buy a new plate and insurance before they can drive it away. The old plate is retained by the original owner and can either be discarded, or is placed upon and registered to another vehicle. Any insurance premium value you may have had remaining on the old vehicle, can be applied to the insurance premium for your new vehicle, or is refunded to you.

Sounds like too many "tax" issues are what's the problem over the pond and one would wonder how much it costs just to administer such a complicated system? :roll:
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Re: DVLA Confused Over Bike Tax Changes

Postby tonupdave » 23 Jan 2014, 14:52

I want to know what I do in the Post office when I tax my Classic? used to be Tax,Insurance and MOT...Now the tax is Free and now and I don't need an MOT so do I go to my Post Office and wave my Insurance in the air and say tell the DVLA I have Insurance so there!!!!!! No charge?
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Re: DVLA Confused Over Bike Tax Changes

Postby Derek-Dex-French » 23 Jan 2014, 21:33

TUD, do you really think any of this has been properly thought through? We can assume not, and that confusion will reign for the next year or so whilst the implications of this policy-change sink in.
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Re: DVLA Confused Over Bike Tax Changes

Postby Mehitsme » 23 Jan 2014, 21:41

Unless you plan on selling your vehicle then the issues highlighted wont apply.

On the plus side rather than paying 6/12 months in one hit there is now the option to pay monthly by direct debit.

Having said all that for owners of multiple vehicles (especially if they are the sole user) then scrapping it altogether and putting it on fuel is a better option
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Re: DVLA Confused Over Bike Tax Changes

Postby Andi Archer » 26 Jan 2014, 11:23

They removed the road tax and put it on fuel in Ireland years ago.I did here mention they were going to the run a monthly subscription scheme so no need to pay in one [or two] yearly lumps but Im sure given our government there will be additional "administration" fees
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Re: DVLA Confused Over Bike Tax Changes

Postby oslin2014 » 13 Feb 2014, 17:17

I do not know how you can put the tax on fuel ? it is not just about mileage, it is also about fuel consumption, how do you work out a fair tax between a lorry doing 8 to 10 miles to the gall on average and a bike/car doing 50 mpg ish and a 125 motorbike doing 100 mpg ? and what about electric cars ?
I do think it is crazy for some new vehicles to be paying no tax at all, and I do not mean the classics, I think all vehicles should be paying road tax if they use the road, except those who do very little mileage, i.e going to classic car shows for example.
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Re: DVLA Confused Over Bike Tax Changes

Postby Derek-Dex-French » 13 Feb 2014, 17:27

Heavier vehicles cause a disproportionate amount of damage to the roads - more fuel=more damage=more tax. However at the same time we need the benefits of lower transport costs so larger lorries are beneficial for economies of scale. I think fuel tax IS the most efficient way of paying for the roads. However road tax, fuel tax, etc., clearly raise far more tax for government than just paying for the roads (looking at the potholes around our area of Surrey the roads look like they have been abandoned and are VERY potholed right now).
Taxes (and fines) are used to help change people's behaviour, so there is a logic in making low-CO2 cars mostly free of tax (for environment reasons) to encourage their use. But I agree with Keith is does seem unfair at times, especially for motorcycles which are the least (after bicycles) damaging for the roads.
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Re: DVLA Confused Over Bike Tax Changes

Postby Pieter Huizinga » 13 Feb 2014, 17:56

Gas duties have been raised here to the highest level in Europe.

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Example: More than 1 euro of 1.65 euro/liter is TAX. € 0.755 Duty and 0.287 VAT. That is Tax On Tax. Only in Holland, folks.

Unexpected result: tax revenue has gone DOWN. Why? Because folks are flocking across the border to Germany, Belgium or Luxemburg in massive amounts, not just to fill up but while they're there they also do all their shopping. As a result, gas stations, supermarkets and shops in an area up to 100 km to the border are going bankrupt like flies.

Of course, the government is in total denial.

Now, living on your island in splendid isolation, you wouldn't have that issue I guess. ;)
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Re: DVLA Confused Over Bike Tax Changes

Postby mbrST1100 » 13 Feb 2014, 19:19

Derek-Dex-French wrote:I think fuel tax IS the most efficient way of paying for the roads.

Yeah, if fuel taxes are used for road financing... over here they'd cancelled that concept many years ago... so the 57% tax we've to pay on fuel get dumped into the general pot and wasted there...
And beside this already existing road-tax (those who drive more, pay more fuel-tax...), we still get a road-pricing on top of that due the highway-toll...
...so there is a logic in making low-CO2 cars mostly free of tax (for environment reasons) to encourage their use.

That 'logic' goes only so far, as the clients would indeed turn to smaller, lightweight vehicles with reasonable horsepower...
But since the industry only offers automobiles of constantly increasing size, increasing weight and progressively raising engine power, that hypothesis does not conclude...

Same BS was going on with the 'scrapping premium' over here, where the gov lured the folks with like € 2000,- discount when they buy a new car, cause it will have lower emissions...
Sorry, considering the pollution arising when building a new car for me, from mining the ore, transport, processes in the steel plant, all the pollution during Bauxite mining, the aluminium production, creating the chemicals for all the platics, the paints, glass for the windows, rubber for tires and hoses, etc, etc... and then compare the narrow difference in the emissions of that 'new' car to the ones of my current vehicle... I can probably keep my '96 Toyota in operation for another couple of centuries, and its still better for the environment...
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