Page 2 of 3

Re: Bit more practice needed.

PostPosted: 05 May 2013, 17:04
by WJBertrand
I find it interesting that all of the crashes I've seen on video form that bend are in the uphill direction. Usually this is an easier skill set than downhill.

ImageUploadedByTapatalk1367769858.728271.jpg
ImageUploadedByTapatalk1367769858.728271.jpg (90.6 KiB) Viewed 15148 times


Proof I've made it through!


-Jeff-
STOC 025

Re: Bit more practice needed.

PostPosted: 05 May 2013, 17:34
by Andi Archer
Well if they had ridden an ST maybe the story would have been different :D

Re: Bit more practice needed.

PostPosted: 16 Jun 2013, 21:44
by David W
Andi Archer wrote:I thought the first one ...

mbrST1100 wrote:Didn't see a sudden movement which would indicate ground contact, so I rather assume that he'd opened the throttle a bit too much; thus the rear tire lost siding...

I would tend to agree, but I would add that the main problem seemed to be that the rider was aware that he was being "filmed" and was therefore showing off a bit.

Re: Bit more practice needed.

PostPosted: 17 Jun 2013, 21:08
by mbrST1100
Dave W II wrote:...the rider was aware that he was being "filmed" and was therefore showing off a bit.

Just never allow yourself to get provoked thus passionate while riding...

Re: Bit more practice needed.

PostPosted: 17 Jun 2013, 21:36
by Keith Legge

Re: Bit more practice needed.

PostPosted: 17 Jun 2013, 21:39
by Keith Legge

Re: Bit more practice needed.

PostPosted: 18 Jun 2013, 18:38
by mbrST1100
Well, hang off with knee down on public road is a no go as there just no reserves...

Re: Bit more practice needed.

PostPosted: 19 Jun 2013, 09:17
by Andi Archer
That bend certainly seems to cause some people a lot of issues be it lean angle,braking technique or positioning.There are some very fortunate riders in those videos able to walk away through good gear design. :shock:

Re: Bit more practice needed in that first video.

PostPosted: 24 Jun 2013, 02:50
by David W
Andi Archer wrote:... There are some very fortunate riders in those videos able to walk away through good gear design. :shock:


I agree. That very first video shows why a high-side mishap can be so dangerous. That rider came down really hard on a rough surface, but he seemed to have just enough good apparel on to avoid serious injury. (The end of that video zooms in a bit on that aspect.)

A Retraction on Rear traction

PostPosted: 06 Jul 2013, 02:57
by David W
Dave W II wrote:
Andi Archer wrote:I thought the first one had struck the tarmac with possibly the foot peg or even the side of his foot due to the extreme lean angle, then he tried to compensate but over did it ....

mbrST1100 wrote:Didn't see a sudden movement which would indicate ground contact, so I rather assume that he'd opened the throttle a bit too much; thus the rear tire lost siding...

I would tend to agree [with the throttle idea] ....


In that very first video clip, I must change my previous post, which I am quoting above, from over acceleration, to poor braking. I now think the rider was trying to turn left onto the gravel area where the camera was. He needed to slow down for two reasons: to turn, and because he was leaving pavement and entering gravel. He probably leaned his bike before his rear braking was completed, and locked up his rear wheel. He might have saved it if he would have kept that rear locked until nearly stopped. But he released it instead, which on dry pavement, can and did cause a classic high side.

I do not have the audio portion of that clip; so Andi might be right about the left foot peg hitting the pavement. Is there any helpful audio available? Engine sounds? Wheel rubber squeal? (If so, can someone listen to it and give their opinion?)